Film & Television

RTA filmmakers students tackle corporate greed

RTA filmmakers students tackle corporate greed

Imagine a world where a large corporate company with enough power to both save communities from drought but also escape the law when it poisons them.

This is the focus of Unearthed, a dramatic, short-film in production by a group of RTA students meant to address the ethics behind the business of food.

by Aidan Macnab· · Arts & Life, Film & Television
The Remnants of Eden Logo

Student film confronts relationship sex abuse

Meet Glass Ceiling Productions, a group of five young women in their fourth year of Ryerson’s RTA School of Media releasing a film that is normalizing the conversation of sexual assault, abuse and consent.

Their coming-of-age film, The Remnants of Eden, is about sexual consent in a relationship and speaks about a traumatic event that happens to the main character, Eden Rosen.

by Christiane Beya· · Features, Film & Television
Dylan Woodley, 22, has been making stop-motion animation videos since he was 12-years-old. (@dylanwoodley via Instagram)

Former image arts student builds a life out of lego

The tiny Lego bricks that coloured most people’s childhoods are designed to make virtually anything. In the case of a former School of Image Arts student, they made his career.                  

Dylan Woodley’s game is stop-motion animation: making seamless movement out of Lego bricks one frame at a time. The 22-year-old has made videos seen by millions of people, including the official Lego remake of Ed Sheeran’s hit song Lego House, as well as his versions of Coldplay’s Viva la Vida and Foster the People’s Houdini.

Matt King and Andrew Ferguson are childhood friends and started LaRue Entertainment together. (Photo courtesy of LaRue Entertainment)

Ryerson grads’ production company to première show about a crack-smoking mayor

LaRue Entertainment, a production company founded by two Ryerson alumni, will debut their new digital series on YouTube called Filth City on Nov. 5. The date also marks the four-year anniversary of Rob Ford’s admitting to smoking crack.

The show is about a fictional big-city mayor embroiled in a controversy surrounding his own crack video. Creating a comedy loosely based on the late Toronto mayor and the scandal he left behind led his brother Doug Ford to call the show “disgusting.”

by Aidan Macnab· · Arts & Life, Film & Television
The Remnants of Eden Logo

RTA students crowdfunded $5,000 for film about consent

A group of five Ryerson women are trying to encourage students to speak up and support each other about consent.

Glass Ceiling Productions, formed by the fourth-year RTA School of Media students, is currently working on a film about consent in young relationships. The movie, called The Remnants of Eden, tackles an important and sensitive issue.

by Christiane Beya· · Film & Television, News
MOVIE MONDAYS: The Florida Project

MOVIE MONDAYS: The Florida Project

The Florida Project, written and directed by Sean Baker, is a film that follows the lives of several motel guests throughout one summer in a dirt-poor part of Florida. It is not a film with an overly complex plot and it is not hard to follow at all. And yet, despite how simple the film can seem at times, it is also extremely thought-provoking and emotionally deep. It is, by leaps and bounds, one of the most beautiful and captivating films to come along in 2017.

Peak rush hour outside of the Eaton Centre (Photo courtesy of the Ryersonian archives)

The Rye student guide to fall reading week

Tired of classes yet? Dreading midterms? Have you forgotten what the outside of a textbook looks like? Thanksgiving break and reading week are only a few short days away and Toronto has no shortage of events to keep you busy.

If you’re planning on staying on campus, Ryerson’s library and the Student Learning Centre will be closed Thanksgiving Monday but will operate at regular hours for the rest of reading week.

"It’s a story by black people for everyone," comments Harris on her upcoming film challenging shadeism within people of color. (Photo by John Ker)

Ryerson film alumna explores shadeism within the black community

Toronto-based documentary filmmaker Sara Yacobi-Harris tackled the perspectives and narratives of multi-ethnic Jewish identity in her 2016 film Who Is a Jew?. However, her deep interest in unravelling identity hasn’t stopped growing just yet, as the filmmaker takes on a new film about shadeism, entitled Dancing Through Shades.

“The film tackles the taboo subject of Shadeism by exploring the experiences of light skin individuals versus dark-skinned individuals, but also breaking down the construction of beauty and privilege that is perpetuated through shadeism and colourism” Yacobi-Harris said.

by Abigail Murta· · Arts & Life, Film & Television
Movie Review: “American Made”

Movie Review: “American Made”

There are two types of famous actors.

There are those who slide from film to film in a chameleon-like manner, constantly changing colours and taking on roles that push them to be something completely different from what they were before. The late Philip Seymour Hoffman was a classic example.

(Photo by William Ukh)

Stigma behind the afro is challenged in Ryerson alumnae film

With four films now under her belt, it’s just the beginning for Toronto-based director Alicia K. Harris. Her experimental short film Maybe If It Were a Nice Room, which explores her personal experience of rape, was featured at the Female Eye Film Festival in 2016 and won best production design at the North American Film Awards.

That same year, Harris tackled a new and profoundly sensitive topic in her upcoming short film Pick: the social stigma around the afro.

by Abigail Murta· · Arts & Life, Film & Television
Movie Mondays: “Stronger”

Movie Mondays: “Stronger”

Every so often, there is a film that vocalizes the claustrophobia and hollowness of PTSD in just as an effective manner as any war movie ever could. Stronger, David Gordon Green’s biopic about the Boston Marathon bombings survivor Jeff Bauman, is the latest film to show just how overwhelming and depressive dealing with PTSD can be.

by Evan Manning· · Arts & Life, Film & Television, Opinion
Ryerson’s RTA School of Media Wall of Fame along the halls of the Rogers Communication Centre features an extensive list of graduates that have gone on to become leaders in their industry. (Photo by Max Ciarmela)

Jay Onrait inspires Ryerson’s first sport media generation

By: Max Ciarmela and Luke Bellus  As Jay Onrait and Dan O’Toole return to TSN to host their new show, SportsCentre with Jay and Dan, some of Ryerson’s first sport media graduating students credit Onrait for inspiring their generation. “The most frequent comment I get is, ‘I grew up with you guys,’” Onrait said. “On one hand it makes us […]

by Ryersonian Staff· · Film & Television, Sports
VOICES: An open letter to Hollywood

VOICES: An open letter to Hollywood

Hi Hollywood, I wanted to introduce myself, in case you weren’t sure what a genuine Asian person looks like. Surprise! I’m a far cry from Scarlett Johansson.  But you knew that, didn’t you? You must have, since the Internet explodes every time you even consider casting a white actor as a character of colour. How else do you explain the […]

by Christine Chua· · Film & Television, Opinion
(Photo by Sally Goldberg Powell)

Movie Mondays: “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”

Films directed by Martin McDonagh exist in a world of extravagant violence and interminable cursing. Hearing the words shit or fuck are as likely as hearing hello and punches are not shied away from in the slightest. No one outside of Quentin Tarantino intertwines the two with such seamless results. And although McDonagh relentlessly employs these devices, it is never […]

by Evan Manning· · Arts & Life, Film & Television, Opinion
(Courtesy Warner Bros. Pictures)

Monday movie reviews: “It”

Up until the age of maybe six or seven, I was afraid of the basement. I would stand at the top of the staircase in my old house, frozen in a state of fright as I gazed down into the shadowy abyss for minutes at a time. When the lights were off, I always thought there was something looming in […]

by Evan Manning· · Arts & Life, Film & Television, Media, Opinion
Aidan Shipley (front) and Grayson Moore (back) are Ryerson image arts alumni and the co-directors of Cardinals, a movie premiering this month at TIFF. (Photo courtesy of Aidan Shipley)

Ryerson alumni bring new feature film to the big screen at TIFF

As the excitement of the Toronto International Film Festival takes over the city, a group of Ryerson Image Arts alumni are getting ready to celebrate the world première of their new movie Cardinals. Cardinals is the directorial debut from film studies students Aidan Shipley and Grayson Moore. The pair previously worked together on Shipley’s fourth-year thesis film, the 2014 short […]

by Angela McLean· · Arts & Life, Film & Television, Theatre
The controversial Niagara Falls student film

The controversial Niagara Falls student film

From our April 6 broadcast, Justin Bellmore reports on the controversy around the Ryerson student film, “As Niagara Falls.”

Hanne Jovin is a fourth-year film studies student and the director of Erika. (Robyn Bell/ Ryersonian)

Students to Watch: Fourth-year film student retells her grandmother’s WWII past

Fourth-year film studies student Hanna Jovin is the director of her thesis project, Erika, a short film about her grandmother in Bosnia during the Second World War.

Student filmmakers Justin Diezmo and Christian Bunea. (Luke Galati/Ryersonian Staff)

Ryerson film studies alumni stand with image arts students who made Niagara Falls video

Film studies alumnus Andrew Munger said asking students to take down Ryerson logo is “disgusting.”

Rebeca

UPDATED: Ryerson grad is challenging Hollywood diversity in film

Rebeca Ortiz aims to tackle minority representation in films, starting with her upcoming short movie, Abuela.

RTA practicum students at the premiere of For Clara.(Justin Bellmore/Ryersonian Staff)

RTA film ‘For Clara’ raises awareness for saving lives through organ donating

“Everyday, somebody’s life is being changed and the real tragedy is all the people who don’t get that chance.”

Scene from the short film, As Niagara Falls. (Courtesy Mayday Pictures)

Ryerson apologizes for students’ depiction of Niagara Falls

Ryerson University has publicly apologized to the mayor of Niagara Falls, Jim Diodati, for a student film made in connection with the School of Image Arts.

Adam Garnet Jones on the set of his feature film, Great Great Great. (Courtesy Adam Garnet Jones)

Indigenous Ryerson alumnus releases second feature film

Filmmaker Adam Garnet Jones talks about his film journey and his new feature, Great Great Great.

Barry Avrich (centre) poses with part of the film collection he'll be donating to Ryerson University. (Courtesy Ryerson.ca)

Legendary documentarian donates film collection to Ryerson

Barry Avrich is giving back to Ryerson with his exclusive archives of original films, raw footage and extended interviews.

(Courtesy Alicia Harris)

Ryerson alumnae shows a different meaning of rape through chilling short film

I had the chance to interview Alicia Harris in the hotel she was raped in to discuss what it took for her to go public about her story.   REVIEW  “Maybe if it were a nice room with bedding that was pristine, you would have wanted it to stay that way.” Alicia Harris recites the poem she wrote for Maybe If It Were […]

Running against all odds

Running against all odds

Masters student Kate Mackenzie discusses her documentary film debut: “The Secret Marathon.”

Film Fridays: Get Out

Film Fridays: Get Out

It’s rare for a thriller to be equally terrifying and hilarious. But Get Out accomplishes just that. Get Out, written and directed by Jordan Peele, is a horror film that revolves around couple Chris (Daniel Kaluuya) and Rose (Allison Williams); Chris is black and Rose is white, and is worth mentioning as the movie is an on-point criticism of modern-day racism.

A screenshot from Dam! The Story of Kit the Beaver. (Courtesy Kjell Boersma)

Ryerson alumnus creates silent film for Canada’s 150th

Created by Ryerson film alumnus Kjell Boersma, the movie follows Kit, a young and spirited beaver who finds herself on adventures with different animals as she collects wood for her colony’s dam. The film officially premiered to the public on Saturday at the end of a film-themed concert performed by the TSO and conducted by Earl Lee.

by Robyn Bell· · Arts & Life, Film & Television
Still photo from the film 'Maybe.'

Ryerson students dominate the Toronto Youth Shorts Film Festival

Twelve of the 29 films being screened at the Toronto Youth Shorts Film Festival were produced by Ryerson students or recent grads.

by Vanessa Nigro· · Arts & Life, Film & Television, Media
Film Fridays: The Lego Batman Movie

Film Fridays: The Lego Batman Movie

In the film, Batman is trying to once again save Gotham City from utter demise. This time, the Joker and his band of villains are threatening to blow up the fictional city with an underwater bomb. The Joker’s incentive? To get Batman to acknowledge their “hate relationship,” which looks a lot like love. The dynamic between the Joker (Zach Galifianakis) […]

All-female film crew and Ryerson alumna director premiere Below Her Mouth

All-female film crew and Ryerson alumna director premiere Below Her Mouth

Below Her Mouth pushes boundaries through the female gaze

(Courtesy La La Land website)

Film Fridays: La La Land review

La La Land has it all: singing, dancing, comedy, drama and romance. Mia (Emma Stone) is a struggling actress. Her life consists of running from her part-time job to auditions. Life hasn’t worked out the way she wanted it to. She thought she would’ve made it in L.A. by now, but she hasn’t. Sebastian (Ryan Gosling) is a down-on-his-luck jazz musician. […]

Things to do this weekend (Dec. 2-4)

Things to do this weekend (Dec. 2-4)

It’s finally December! What better way to welcome the holiday season then by going out an exploring the wonderful events happening in the city. 1.Treasure Island Treasure Island opens tonight! You can still pick up your tickets at our box office at 345 Yonge St. or online at ryersontreasureisland.bpt.me . . . . #TreasureIsland #RUPerformance #Ryerson #Aaarryouready #RUTreasureIsland #RyersonPirates #Performance345 A photo […]

Joyce Carpenter, the mother of Patricia Carpenter, in her home during shooting for the documentary. (Courtesy Shades of Our Sisters)

RTA project honours missing and murdered indigenous women

For their final thesis project, eight media production students came together and created Shades of Our Sisters, an installation that celebrates the lives of missing and murdered indigenous women, trans and two-spirit individuals. The project focuses on the lives of Patricia Carpenter and Sonya Cywink, two of the more than 1200 missing and murdered indigenous women. The installation is a […]

by Kelsey Adams· · Arts & Life, Film & Television, Media, News
A lot of people believe that feminism is only for women, but it's also for men. (Ryersonian Archive)

What does feminism mean?

Feminism’s a word that a vast majority of people don’t fully understand. Until recently, I didn’t completely understand it either. This is partly because in the media, most movies and TV shows never give a definition. Equality shown in media In the TV shows and movies that I watched growing up, most of the characters I saw were shown in […]

(Courtesy YouTube Trailer)

Film Fridays: Moana review

The thing that separates Moana from other Disney films is the culture it depicts. It’s rare for the Hawaiian culture to get a spotlight and Disney has now brought the land and culture to the big screen. When Moana is a young girl, the ocean calls to her and gives her a stone. She learns through oral stories that this […]

Billy Lynn (Joe Alywn) crying while hearing the national anthem. (Courtesy Sony Pictures)

Film Fridays: Billy Lynn’s Long Halftime Walk review

Ang Lee has created an honest film about what the realities of war are and what the media perceives them to be. Billy Lynn (Joe Alywn) and his fellow soldiers have come back home to America for a victory tour. This comes after Lynn’s team, Bravo, are caught on camera in a harrowing battle in Iraq. Yet, the young soldier […]

Canada gets first 4DX movie theatre at Yonge and Dundas

Canada gets first 4DX movie theatre at Yonge and Dundas

Canada has received its first 4DX auditorium at Cineplex Cinemas on Yonge and Dundas Streets and the new theatre experience is getting great reviews. “The response we’ve gotten has been overwhelmingly positive,” said Sarah Van Lange, the director of communications at Cineplex. “We were anticipating Canadians to love 4DX but we weren’t expecting almost every show to be sold out.” Viewers can […]

(Courtesy Sony)

Film Fridays: Arrival review

Arrival is not the usual alien invasion film. Amy Adams plays expert linguistics professor Louise Banks. When 12 alien space crafts land in different locations across the world, she’s asked by the government to help. She ends up leading the American team to try to figure out why the aliens have invaded Earth. Yet, it’s only Banks who believes the aliens […]

(Courtesy of Focus Features)

Film Fridays: Loving review

It’s shocking to think that in 1967, the state of Virginia had a law that prohibited interracial marriage. The new film Loving tells the story of an interracial couple’s fight to remain married and live in their state. The film is based on the true story of Richard and Mildred Loving, who fell in love in the state of Virginia. […]

The movie poster for Moonlight. (Courtesy of A24)

It’s time to end stereotypes in movies

There’s never been a film quite like Barry Jenkins’ Moonlight. Moonlight focuses on the narrative of a young black male coming out while living in inner-city Miami during the 1980s. The most revolutionary scenes of the 2017 Oscars contender happen when two black men are allowed to be intimate and vulnerable with each other. This is a rarity on screen. […]

by Kelsey Adams· · Film & Television, Opinion
Mary Gyulay is the inspiration behind the film VIABLE. (Courtesy Melissa Scicluna)

Q-and-A: Rye grad and ‘VIABLE’ director talks MS

In the summer of 2014, Mary Gyulay was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis, and at the age of 22 her life changed forever. Her journey inspired the story behind the short film VIABLE, which she directed and co-wrote. Gyulay is an RTA graduate who initially created this short film with her team of RTA grads for their course practicum. The film was […]

(Courtesy of David Leyes)

Q-and-A: Rye grad talks about new TV show Second Jen

Amanda Joy and Samantha Wan first met each other on the set of a horror film in 2014. Two years later, they’re starring on a TV show they’ve written and created. Second Jen, which airs on City, explores the cultural and generational gaps that most children of immigrant parents experience. Joy is an actor, screenwriter, producer and comedian. She studied […]

by Danielle Lee· · Arts & Life, Film & Television
RTA grads take VIABLE to Orlando Film Festival

RTA grads take VIABLE to Orlando Film Festival

  What initially started as a course practicum has recently taken a team of RTA grads beyond the classroom and onto the big screen at the Orlando Film Festival. “This particular story was an important one to tell because it’s a personal story about multiple sclerosis,” says Mary Gyulay, director, co-writer, and inspiration behind the film VIABLE. “It meant a […]

by Selena Singh· · Arts & Life, Film & Television, Health
(Courtesy Marvel Website)

Film Fridays: Doctor Strange review

It seems that Marvel has figured out what the movie-going audience wants and delivers it to the silver screen. This is no different with Doctor Strange. It was once said that the comic was the only one that wouldn’t work on screen. Well, somehow Marvel has made it work in very strange, pun intended, and unique ways. The film follows […]

(Courtesy Hacksaw Ridge movie website)

Film Fridays: Hacksaw Ridge review

War is a big topic on the news all around the world. The subject is never a positive one and has an impact not only on the people directly involved, but on the world as a whole. People are seeking refuge, being taken away from their families, and soldiers and innocent civilians are dying everyday. So in the world that we […]

(Amira Zubairi)

From the stage to the camera

A Ryerson dance graduate is taking her first step back into the dance world after suffering from a brain injury. Only this time, instead of being up on stage, she’ll be behind a camera. Miranda Forbes, who graduated from Ryerson in 2009, has been dancing since she was a child. In 2012, Forbes suffered a brain injury after being hit […]

(Courtesy A24)

Film Fridays: Moonlight review

The Toronto International Film Festival’s 2016 indie-hit is now ready to have its big weekend release. Moonlight follows an African-American male, named Chiron, from his childhood to adulthood. It takes place in three acts. The first when he’s a child, the second as a teenager, and the third as the man he’s become. As a child living in a poor […]

(Courtesy of Pinterest)

Get spooky and spirited: Halloween films featuring previous Ryerson students

Halloween is only a couple of days away, which means everyone is looking for a scary movie to get them in the spirit. For students, heading to the cinema is costly. So why not cozy up with your computer and watch a former Ryerson student act in a horror film? It will make you scared, save you money and see […]

Q-and-A: Rye grad and ‘Little Mosque’ creator talks comedy

Q-and-A: Rye grad and ‘Little Mosque’ creator talks comedy

Since graduating from the Ryerson journalism program in 1992, Zarqa Nawaz has carved out an impressive comedy career. She created the hit CBC show Little Mosque on the Prairie, based on her documentary Me and the Mosque. The Ryersonian spoke to Nawaz about everything from laughing about Islamophobia to her thoughts on Donald Trump’s election campaign. Q: You’ve been a […]

by Avneet Dhillon· · Arts & Life, Film & Television
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