Literature

Things to do this weekend (Dec. 2-4)

Things to do this weekend (Dec. 2-4)

It’s finally December! What better way to welcome the holiday season then by going out an exploring the wonderful events happening in the city. 1.Treasure Island Treasure Island opens tonight! You can still pick up your tickets at our box office at 345 Yonge St. or online at ryersontreasureisland.bpt.me . . . . #TreasureIsland #RUPerformance #Ryerson #Aaarryouready #RUTreasureIsland #RyersonPirates #Performance345 A photo […]

#RUKind initiative wraps up 5 days of giveaways

#RUKind initiative wraps up 5 days of giveaways

In honour of World Kindness Day on Nov.13, Ryerson Student Life wrapped up their #RUKind campaign on Nov.18 which included 5 days of prize giveaways to students along with on campus activities to inspire kindness. The campaign began in 2014 through a social media campaign as a way to celebrate World Kindness day, where students were encouraged to share their stories of […]

(Courtesy Marvel Website)

Film Fridays: Doctor Strange review

It seems that Marvel has figured out what the movie-going audience wants and delivers it to the silver screen. This is no different with Doctor Strange. It was once said that the comic was the only one that wouldn’t work on screen. Well, somehow Marvel has made it work in very strange, pun intended, and unique ways. The film follows […]

Kamal Al-Solaylee's book Brown has been shortlisted for a Governor General Literary Award (Ryersonian Archives)

Rye journalism prof on the Governor General’s short list

Ryerson journalism professor Kamal Al-Solaylee’s new book, Brown: What Being Brown in the World Today Means (to Everyone), has made the short list for the 2016 Governor General’s Literary Award. It was announced on Tuesday that Al-Solaylee’s book, about brown-skinned perspectives around the world, made the cut in the non-fiction category for one of Canada’s most prestigious literary awards. A […]

by Olivia Chandler· · Literature, News, On Campus
Rye story site heads to warped tour

Rye story site heads to warped tour

A Ryerson social media outlet is heading to Warped Tour this summer.

by Deven Knill· · Arts & Life, Literature
(Courtesy Surita Gor)

Rye grad to be published in national library

When Ryerson graduate Virus the Poet started doing spoken word, he said it was a way for him to “give a voice to the voiceless.” Now the Toronto-based artist is being published in an anthology for the Library and Archives Canada in Ottawa. “Spoken word poetry, to me, means encouraging and supporting human beings,” said Virus, born Viral Gor. He […]

by Alexia Kapralos· · Arts & Life, Literature, Media
Poet Rupi Kaur visits Ryerson

Poet Rupi Kaur visits Ryerson

Students celebrate International Women’s Day with Rupi Kaur

by Ryersonian Staff· · Arts & Life, Literature
Aeman Ansari / Ryersonian Staff

This Week in Magical Thinking: David Foster Wallace’s This Is Water

I only have a few more days left as a student at the school of journalism and I am terrified. I’m terrified of not having the status of being a student to hide behind anymore, terrified of having to figure out what I want to do for the rest of my life. But most of all, I’m terrified to graduate […]

by Aeman Ansari· · Arts & Life, Literature
Bookbinding and restoration surviving at Ryerson and in Toronto

Bookbinding and restoration surviving at Ryerson and in Toronto

Art Seto has been teaching the binding and finishing course at Ryerson, one of the only ones taught at a four-year university program in Canada, since 2006. “I don’t think books are going anywhere. Print is not going anywhere. If anything, it’s evolving rather than disappearing,” said 57-year-old Seto. His course shows students how to build a book by hand, […]

by Aeman Ansari· · Arts & Life, Literature
Courtesy of Aeman Ansari

This Week in Magical Thinking: Written on the Body

From the movies currently in the theatres – Insurgent, Chappie and Cinderella – to the bestselling books and most watched shows, the theme of love is always present. I have been cynical about and uncomfortable with the kinds of everlasting romance presented in music, movies and even literature. It’s very possible that I have a manufacturing defect and the part […]

by Aeman Ansari· · Arts & Life, Literature
Despite the loss, the Ryerson poets are proud of being the only Canadian team to compete. (Courtesy of Brian Millado)

Rye students take slam poetry to the States

By Cole Deakin Approximately $600 in out-of-pocket expenses and one donation of $3,500 from Ryerson later, a group of seven slam poets from the university made it as the first Canadians to participate in United States’s largest college slam tournament. Sixty-seven other colleges and universities from across the U.S. also competed during a four-day event on the weekend. Ryerson was […]

Gene Allen’s book explores the history of The Canadian Press. (Ryersonian file photo)

Rye instructor shortlisted in Canadian Prize for Humanities

Ryerson journalism instructor Gene Allen is probably the first and only person to have had access to the archives of The Canadian Press (CP). The dozens of boxes of papers and long reels of microfiche records in the basement of CP’s office on Toronto’s King Street E. had mostly been forgotten, filed away without much thought to organization. Even with […]

by Emily Joveski· · Arts & Life, Literature, Media
This Week in Magical Thinking: Never Let Me Go

This Week in Magical Thinking: Never Let Me Go

It’s one thing to read characters in a novel, be touched by them and feel connected to them. But to meet the person who crafted these powerful characters is another thing entirely. Reading is mostly a solitary act. All of your emotions and reactions stay between you and the fictional characters who live on paper. This past week I was […]

by Aeman Ansari· · Arts & Life, Literature
This Week in Magical Thinking: Virginia Woolf

This Week in Magical Thinking: Virginia Woolf

In the days and weeks leading up to International Women’s Day, media and the general public practise a little more sensitivity towards women’s issues and tend to listen, but their attention span is short. As a feminist and a journalist with a special interest in marginalized groups in society, I frequently read fiction and nonfiction that speaks to the narratives […]

by Aeman Ansari· · Arts & Life, Literature
This Week in Magical Thinking: Bridget Jones’s Diary

This Week in Magical Thinking: Bridget Jones’s Diary

A couple of years ago, I was away on vacation in Italy when course enrolment was happening. By the time I got onto RAMSS, there was only one English class available that would fit into my schedule: popular literature. Even as a young reader I shied away from this genre. I naively thought, like many others, that it didn’t have […]

by Aeman Ansari· · Arts & Life, Literature
This week in Magical Thinking: Annabel

This week in Magical Thinking: Annabel

There are books you read for a few minutes during your lunch break and there are books you can’t put down for fear of where the story will go if you do. Fiction allows you to escape your own reality for a while, but the best novels have characters that are an extension of ourselves and our world. They say […]

by Aeman Ansari· · Arts & Life, Literature
Three rules to cartoon by: Canadian cartoonists talk about guiding principles

Three rules to cartoon by: Canadian cartoonists talk about guiding principles

In the aftermath of the massacre of 12 members of the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo, political cartoonists have had to defend their craft. But leading Canadian cartoonists were united on one front: It’s their job to be defiant. But is there a line between acts of defiance and being just plain offensive? Cartoonists interviewed by The Ryersonian found three […]

RADmag goes official with magazine launch party

RADmag goes official with magazine launch party

After a silent release with the first issue, RADmag celebrated the release of their second issue last Thursday with an official launch party at The Great Hall on Queen Street West. The Ryerson student-run magazine showcases student’s works in photography, fashion and interior design and promotes collaboration from different Faculty of Communication and Design (FCAD) programs. The bi-annual publication began as […]

by Elizabeth Glassen· · Arts & Life, Literature
Book Review: Lena Dunham’s Not That Kind Of Girl is part privilege story, part success story

Book Review: Lena Dunham’s Not That Kind Of Girl is part privilege story, part success story

Some may see a self-absorbed 28-year-old, and others may see a privileged 28-year-old when they read Lena Dunham’s memoir,  Not That Kind of Girl. Dunham is the creator and star of the HBO series Girls, which first aired in 2012. As the title character Hannah Horvath on Girls, she is known for her nude scenes and outspoken attitude. Not That […]

Friday Five Logo (Alexis Allison, The Ryersonian)

Friday Five Audio Series – November 7, 2014

This week our hosts talk Interstellar and Christopher Nolan with Ryerson radio and television arts professor Micheal Coutanche; look back on 45 years of Sesame Street as the long-running children’s program celebrates a birthday; discuss the upcoming movie Merry Friggin’ Christmas starring Robin Williams and what it means to re-cut movies featuring actors after they’ve passed; our wildly uneducated guesses for […]

Ryerson’s Transmedia Zone collaborates for #YourFry Library Design Challenge

Ryerson’s Transmedia Zone collaborates for #YourFry Library Design Challenge

Innovators, designers and storytellers got together in groups at the Toronto Reference Library on Thursday. By the end of the day, each group had to present an innovative idea for the library of the future. Ryerson’s Transmedia Zone, Penguin Random House and the Toronto Reference Library collaborated to hold the very first #YourFry Library Design Challenge. The hashtag #YourFry signifies […]

Live Blog: #YourFry Library Design Challenge

Live Blog: #YourFry Library Design Challenge

Reporters Rachel Surman and Rebecka Calderwood are spending the day at the Toronto Reference Library at the #Yourfry Library Design Challenge.

Photographer Unknown, Harry Colebourn feeding Winnie, Salisbury Plain, England, 1914, gelatin silver print. From The Colebourn Family Archive.  (Ryerson Image Centre)

‘Willy, nilly, silly old bear’ is coming to image centre

Winnie the Pooh, the loveable, yellow bear in a red shirt, is coming to the Ryerson Image Centre. The month-long exhibit, Remembering the Real Winnie, will open Nov. 5. It showcases the origin of one of literature’s favourite characters. The idea for the character originates from a real Canadian bear that was the mascot of the Canadian war brigade during the […]

Ryerson professor investigates world of online gambling in new book

Ryerson professor investigates world of online gambling in new book

In his latest book Life Real Loud, Ryerson journalism associate professor Bill Reynolds follows the downward spiral of Canadian philanthropist and entrepreneur John Lefebvre. Lefebvre, a lawyer by trade, founded Neteller, an online startup that processes payments between gamblers and the websites on which they play. Shortly after Neteller started making a name for itself in the gambling world, the Calgary native and marijuana enthusiast found […]

by Halla Imam· · Arts & Life, Literature, Top stories
Ryerson instructor Adam Nyman in a still from a Ryersonian video. Nayman is a speaker at this year's Word on the Street festival. (Ryersonian)

Word on the Street: Rye instructor on short-format non-fiction

A Ryerson instructor will be speaking at the “Nothing but The Truth” tent at this year’s Word on the Street festival. The 25th annual festival aims to showcase the best in literary non-fiction, and the tent features local authors speaking about topics such as fathering an adopted child, the popularity of brunch and Arctic exploration. Adam Nayman, a sessional film instructor at […]

by Laura Calabrese· · Arts & Life, Literature
Ryersonian Book Club: Graceling, by Kristin Cashore

Ryersonian Book Club: Graceling, by Kristin Cashore

Title: Graceling Genre: Young Adult, Fantasy Pages: 480 About the author: Kristin Cashore grew up in a rickety old house, inhabited by three sisters and a scattering of cats at the top of a hill in the countryside of northeastern Pennsylvania. During those years, she read while brushing her teeth and chopping parsley. Books were the first thing she grabbed […]

by Bethany Van Lingen· · Arts & Life, Literature
(Matt Oxman/ Ryersonian staff)

Ryersonian Book Club: The Fault in our Stars, by John Green

Title: The Fault in our Stars Genre: Young Adult Pages: 313 About the author: John Green was inspired to write this novel while working at a children’s hospital. He was also influenced by his friend Esther Earl, who had thyroid cancer and died at 16. The novel has been made into a movie starring Shailene Woodley, which will be released […]

(Matt Oxman/ Ryersonian staff)

Ryersonian Book Club: Divergent, by Veronica Roth

Title: Divergent Genre: Science Fiction / Young Adult Pages: 487 About the author: Veronica Roth is an American author best known for the Divergent trilogy, which also include Insurgent and Allegiant. The last book was released in October of last year. While on winter break of her senior year of the creative writing program at Northwestern University in Chicago, Veronica […]

Ryersonian Book Club: Indian Horse, by Richard Wagamese

Ryersonian Book Club: Indian Horse, by Richard Wagamese

Title: Indian Horse Genre: Native Fiction Pages: 221 About the Author: Richard Wagamese is one of Canada’s most prominent native authors. He has earned accolades for his column writing, poetry, six novels and five non-fiction books. Indian Horse was selected as a 2013 finalist for CBC’s Canada Reads program. Wagamese, an Ojibway from northwestern Ontario Wabaseemoong First Nation, uses his […]

Ryersonian Book Club: Crazy Town: The Rob Ford Story, by Robyn Doolittle

Ryersonian Book Club: Crazy Town: The Rob Ford Story, by Robyn Doolittle

Title: Crazy Town: The Rob Ford Story Genre: Biography Pages: 304 About the author: Robyn Doolittle is The Toronto Star’s city hall reporter. The Ryerson grad thought she was getting a demotion when her position changed at The Star, from crime reporting to reporting on City Hall. But soon, both of those worlds collided, and Doolittle found herself reporting on […]

by jsmohame· · Arts & Life, Literature
Through Black Spruce by Joseph Boyden (Illustration: Matt Oxman / Ryersonian).

Ryersonian Book Club: Through Black Spruce, by Joseph Boyden

Title: Through Black Spruce by Joseph Boyden Genre: Native fiction/drama Pages: 407 About the author: Joseph Boyden is one of Canada’s leading native authors, joining the ranks of Tomson Highway, Thomas King and Lee Maracle. He is best known for his first novel Three Day Road, as well as for his most recent work The Orenda – but Through Black […]

by Christian Allaire· · Arts & Life, Literature
Jack Layton’s book club returns

Jack Layton’s book club returns

Behind the tall glass walls of the Ryerson Archives is a display honouring the life of a former Ryerson professor who later became one of Canada’s leading political figures: Jack Layton. Shortly after his death in 2011, his family donated over 1,400 of his books to Ryerson. Approximately 500 are circulating around the library, while the rest can be found […]

by Tanya Cruz· · Arts & Life, Literature, Top stories
Sonian Book Club: The Sittaford Mystery, by Agatha Christie

Sonian Book Club: The Sittaford Mystery, by Agatha Christie

Title: The Sittaford Mystery by Agatha Christie Genre: Mystery Pages: 224 About the author: Christie is famous for her 66 detective novels. Her novels often follow the same pattern: a murder, multiple suspects with secrets, a detective slowly uncovering these secrets, a shocking twist and finally solving the murder. Yet, her books are still full of surprises and are enjoyable to read […]

by Laura Zizek· · Arts & Life, Literature, Top stories
Some of the Ryersonian staff share their favourite books. (Rebecca Sedore and Arti Panday / Ryersonian Staff)

Sonian Book Club: Spring Break Edition

Spring break is just around the corner and although you may be dreaming of warm weather and sandy beaches, most of us will be at home — where winter is still very much present. Snuggling up with a good book is a great way to escape the polar vortex. However, finding the perfect book can sometimes prove to be a challenge. Here […]

by Laura Zizek· · Arts & Life, Literature, Top stories
Film rights sold for Ryerson grad’s book about Rob Ford

Film rights sold for Ryerson grad’s book about Rob Ford

Ryerson graduate Robyn Doolittle has just sold the film and television rights of her newly published book Crazy Town: The Rob Ford Story to Blue Ice Pictures, a Toronto-based production company. Doolittle’s Crazy Town has been on the market for only one week. The book tracks Rob Ford’s rise to mayor and subsequent scandals from Doolittle’s perspective as a reporter for […]

Laura Zizek reading The Portable Dorothy Parker by Dorothy Parker.

Sonian Book Club: The Portable Dorothy Parker, by Dorothy Parker

Title: The Portable Dorothy Parker by Dorothy Parker and edited by Marion Meade Genre: Satire/criticisms/reviews/short stories/poetry Pages: 626  About the author: Parker has worked for publications like Vanity Fair, Vogue and The New Yorker. Through her writing career she met famous writers, actors,  and critics. She also formed the Algonquin Round Table, which included Harper’s Bazaar editor Art Samuels, film star Harpo Marx and New […]

by Laura Zizek· · Arts & Life, Literature
In this Jan. 30, 2014 file photo, Olivia Chow speaks at Ryerson University. (Cosette Schulz/Ryersonian Staff)

Olivia Chow opens up about her journey as a politician

Olivia Chow addressed speculations about her possible bid for Toronto’s mayor during a panel at Ryerson, on Jan. 29. The MP hasn’t confirmed whether she’ll be running for the upcoming mayoral election, but she said she’s still “trying to make a decision.” At the beginning of the panel, host Cathy Crowe, who is a visiting practitioner at Ryerson, asked people […]

by Tanya Cruz· · Arts & Life, Literature, Live Blog, Media
Laura Zizek reading Hyperbole and a Half by Allie Brosh (Shannon Cuciz / Ryersonian Staff)

Sonian Book Club: Hyberbole and a Half, by Allie Brosh

  Title: Hyperbole and a Half: Unfortunate Situations, Flawed Coping Mechanisms, Mayhem, and Other Things That Happened, by Allie Brosh Genre: Graphic memoir/humour Pages: 384 Plot: Brosh’s playful memoir seamlessly brings together stories about cakes, dogs and depression in one colourful book. Why you should read it: You may look like a fool laughing on the subway, but it’s all […]

by Laura Zizek· · Arts & Life, Literature, Top stories
Graeme Smith, Ryerson journalism alumni and former Globe and Mail war reporter.

Ryerson grad shortlisted for Taylor Prize

A Ryerson journalism graduate has been shortlisted for the RBC Taylor Prize for literary non-fiction. Graeme Smith’s war memoir, The Dogs Are Eating Them Now: Our War in Afghanistan, was one of five nominees for the 13-year-old prize. In it, Smith recounts shocking details of his time reporting from the front line of Canada’s mission in southern Afghanistan and how […]

Journalism professor Gene Allen in his Ryerson office on February 12, 2013. (Maria Assaf/Ryersonian Staff).

Q-and-A: Journalism prof Gene Allen delves into CP history

Gene Allen is best-known on campus as an experienced journalist and professor with a CV that includes CBC and the Globe and Mail. As of late though, Allen, who has a PhD and master of arts (MA) in Canadian history, has been recognized for pulling back the curtain on the inner workings of The Canadian Press (CP). His new book, […]

by Maria Siassina· · Arts & Life, Literature
Q-and-A with Douglas Coupland

Q-and-A with Douglas Coupland

Douglas Coupland is a Vancouver-based writer, designer and visual artist. He is best known for his novel Generation X, which gave a name and identity to a group of adults born after the infamous “baby boomers.” Coupland has pushed (or rather shoved) boundaries and norms in his lengthy resumé of short stories, novels and non-fiction. He’s not quitting any time […]

by Maria Siassina· · Arts & Life, Literature
Author Douglas Coupland pens new fiction series ‘Temp’

Author Douglas Coupland pens new fiction series ‘Temp’

Douglas Coupland is known mainly for his international bestseller, Generation X. But with more than a dozen fiction novels, a handful of short stories, and long list of non-fiction under his belt, Coupland isn’t afraid to try new things. His latest literary venture is Temp, a serialized novella is coming out in Metro’s Canadian and global newspaper editions beginning on […]

by Maria Siassina· · Arts & Life, Literature, Media
Canada Reads 2014 offers insight to CanLit

Canada Reads 2014 offers insight to CanLit

The 13th annual CBC Canada Reads competition began in early October, and host Jian Ghomeshi announced the top 40 books chosen by Canadians on Oct. 24. Public voting for the top 10 came to a close this Sunday. And in a matter of weeks five panellists will be revealed and each will choose a novel to defend. Conversation about the […]

by Maria Siassina· · Arts & Life, Literature
Graeme Smith, winner of the Hilary Weston Writers' Trust Prize for Nonfiction for his book The Dogs Are Eating Them Now, accepts the prize from Hon. Hilary M. Weston in Toronto (CNW Group/The Writers' Trust of Canada)

Ryerson graduate wins prestigious non-fiction prize

A Ryerson journalism graduate has won Hilary Weston Writers’ Trust Prize for the best non-fiction book published in Canada this year. Graeme Smith, the author of The Dogs are Eating Them Now: Our War in Afghanistan, was awarded the prize on Monday night at the Art Gallery of Ontario. Read The Ryersonian’s Q&A with Smith The book is about Smith’s […]

by Tara Deschamps· · Arts & Life, Literature
Kamal Al-Solaylee at the Word on the Street Festival (Natalie Chu/Ryersonian Staff)

Kamal Al-Solaylee wins Toronto Book Award

After coming up short in similar contests on four previous occasions Kamal Al-Solaylee could be forgiven for saying he was completely surprised that he had finally won, even as he was announced as winner. “It was such a daze, I didn’t not expect to win at all,” said Al-Solaylee in a phone interview of his Toronto Book Award win. The Ryerson […]

by Natalie Chu· · Arts & Life, Literature
VIDEO: What’s in the paper tomorrow?

VIDEO: What’s in the paper tomorrow?

Hosts: Rebecca Mildon and Sarah-Joyce Battersby Producer: Joshua McLean

Q&A: Writer Graeme Smith

Afghanistan has a hold on Graeme Smith. The former Globe and Mail war reporter and Ryerson journalism alumnus lived in the country from 2006 to 2009, and returned again years later, driven by what he describes as a curiosity to see how the country would fare after NATO troops withdrew. His new book, The Dogs Are Eating Them Now, nominated for the […]

by Kelsey Rolfe· · Arts & Life, Literature, Off Campus
David Smith (Samantha Fernandes / Ryersonian Staff)

Q&A: Political scientist David Smith

For an extended version of the interview below, click here Renowned Canadian political scientist David E. Smith has joined Ryerson as a distinguished visiting professor with the Faculty of Arts’ department of politics and public administration for a one-year term. Smith, who has an honorary doctorate from Ryerson, is professor emeritus in political studies at the University of Saskatchewan and senior […]

by Samantha Fernandes· · Arts & Life, Literature