Opinion

(Courtesy of Sade Lewis)

OPINION: Letter to My Ex-Professor(s)

Thank you for failing me. Yes, thank you. I’m not being sarcastic. Maybe slightly facetious, but in all seriousness: I genuinely mean it when I say thank you.

by Sade Lewis· · Opinion
Photo by Julie Faye Germansky

OPINION: Letter to My Ex-Professor(s)

I was stuck in the worst subway delay of my life, in a five-station closure that doubled my commute time to just over four hours.

But, where most students would have simply headed back home, I was more concerned with getting to this specific class. Anxiety was an understatement. 

by Christine Chua· · Opinion
Photo by Evan Manning

VOICES: False awakenings, my nightmares

In October of 2016, I wrote an article detailing sleep paralysis, the terrifying phenomenon where one “wakes up” within a dream, unaware that they are still dreaming, with the inability to move.

In that article, I briefly mentioned a separate phenomenon of dreaming called false awakenings. For those of you who have never experienced it, here is a look into what false awakenings consist of, and my experiences dealing with them.

by Evan Manning· · Opinion, Voices
"It’s important to recognize that not all abusers and rapists fit the Harvey Weinstein archetype of powerful Hollywood mogul. They are our friends, colleagues, teachers, and those we call our romantic partners." (Photo courtesy of Pixabay)

EDITORIAL: Consent culture must be priority

The high numbers of male and female actors, managers, and publicists who have decided to share their stories of Harvey Weinstein’s alleged sexual assault (which has continued for more than three decades) reminds us of how pervasive rape culture is.

It’s more proof that campus policies geared toward consent culture are vital to students’ safety and should continue.

by Milca Kuflu· · Editorial, Opinion
(Photo by Julie Faye Germansky)

OPINION: Letter to My Ex-Professor(s)

In my last semester of third year, I took a class that had one major project, a midterm and an exam. The class seemed fairly easy, but the major project was an assignment to be done in pairs.

Each pair had to get a topic approved and write an in-depth report. The project was assigned during the second week of the semester and was due  before the final exam. It counted for 40 per cent of my grade. Up until then, I had no complaints about the professor. He seemed knowledgeable, fair and even funny at times. He approved our topic and some of the sources we were planning to use.

by Josie Mills· · Opinion
Kayla McLaughlin, Reporter and Sports Editor for The Ryersonian

OPINION: Letter to My Ex-Professor(s)

This is a letter for more than one professor. This is for all of the teachers and professors who exhibit every disgusting trait students hate.

After spending 18 years in the educational institution known as school, I’ve developed some strong feelings about professors.

by Kayla McLaughlin· · Opinion
MOVIE MONDAYS: The Florida Project

MOVIE MONDAYS: The Florida Project

The Florida Project, written and directed by Sean Baker, is a film that follows the lives of several motel guests throughout one summer in a dirt-poor part of Florida. It is not a film with an overly complex plot and it is not hard to follow at all. And yet, despite how simple the film can seem at times, it is also extremely thought-provoking and emotionally deep. It is, by leaps and bounds, one of the most beautiful and captivating films to come along in 2017.

Lillian Greenblatt  (Ryersonian Archive)

VIDEO: What I wish my professor knew

Today is World Mental Health Day.

According to the Mental Health Commission of Canada, one in five people are living with mental health issues or illness. Students spend a significant amount of time in the classroom, a space that can either address these issues or significantly contribute to them. 

by Ryersonian Staff· · Health, Opinion
OPINION: What Thanksgiving means to me as someone who doesn’t celebrate it

OPINION: What Thanksgiving means to me as someone who doesn’t celebrate it

The first time I ever heard of Thanksgiving was when I sneakily streamed an episode of Friends in middle school, without my mother’s permission. She refused to let me watch the series until I was appropriately old enough to hear the double-entendres.

by Devika Desai· · Opinion
(Photo by Julie Faye Germansky)

EDITORIAL: Giving thanks, but for what?

We’ve finally arrived at that time of year where we have the opportunity to give thanks for all that we’re fortunate for – and to gather with family and friends around an excess amount of turkey and mashed potatoes.

Those who don’t wait for the arrival of Thanksgiving to express their gratitude are likely just as thankful for a day off.

by Ryersonian Staff· · Editorial, Opinion
(Photo by Julie Germansky)

OPINION: It’s time to invest ethically

There’s a saying that goes, he who is not a liberal at 20 has no heart, but he who is not a conservative by 40 has no brain. Is this true? Does entering adulthood, earning an income and raising children force us out of our values and dirty ourselves with the evils of global capitalism?

by Aidan Macnab· · Opinion
OPINION: Why fetishizing guns is moronic

OPINION: Why fetishizing guns is moronic

As a former soldier in the Canadian army, I find this fetishization of guns disgusting. I served in the Toronto Scottish Regiment for seven years. If there is one lesson I have learnt from my time in the forces, it’s that a gun is something you prove yourself worthy to be trusted with. A gun is not a toy. Its sole purpose in life is to end yours. You do not have a right to own a gun.

by Mansoor Tanweer· · Opinion
Movie Review: “American Made”

Movie Review: “American Made”

There are two types of famous actors.

There are those who slide from film to film in a chameleon-like manner, constantly changing colours and taking on roles that push them to be something completely different from what they were before. The late Philip Seymour Hoffman was a classic example.

breastfeeding parents are left with little support at Ryerson. (credit: Pixabay)

OPINION: Breastfeeding spaces at Ryerson

How hard is it to find a place to breastfeed at Ryerson? Surprisingly, pretty hard. Even getting a straight answer from faculty and staff was nearly impossible. And some campus staff don’t know that breastfeeding spaces exist.

After a day of trying to find breastfeeding spaces for student-parents, both designated and not, I found that spaces that were supposed to be available weren’t and I’d have to wait hours for the others.

by Brooke Taylor· · On Campus, Opinion
(Courtesy of Sade Lewis)

OPINION: Black community mental health

The discussion around mental health can make people feel uncomfortable, or embarrassed. Because of that it is an endlessly silenced topic. But if people dismiss their apprehensiveness by speaking up, they are ostracized.

by Sade Lewis· · Opinion
Photo from Pixabay

VOICES: My time in a psychiatric ward

I didn’t think I’d end up like this: snot-nosed and teary-eyed, head down with the indents of my pill bottle in my hands. This was my third time here except this time I was here to stay.

I was in the emergency room, where people went when they had a bad cough. There were crying babies and drunk people; I’m sure their emergencies were a matter of life and death. But mine was all about death.

by Anonymous· · Opinion, Voices
(Courtesy Sander van der Wel/Creative Commons)

EDITORIAL: Mind your language

Three-quarters of lifelong mental illnesses emerge between the ages of 18 and 24. By age 25, 20 per cent of Canadians will have developed a mental illness.

As students, we ought to be aware of our mental health and learn strategies to maintain it. But what does that entail?

by Ryersonian Staff· · Editorial, Opinion
Julia Lloyd worked on perfecting her social media accounts to the point where it didn't reflect reality anymore. 
(Photo by Julie Faye Germansky)

VOICES: My fake social media life

Everyone has something about themselves they wish they could change. Some even go out of their way to portray themselves differently to others for the sake of keeping their true self hidden.

Every day, I worked on perfecting my social media profiles to portray my ideal self. I sometimes felt like I had two personalities to maintain: one that I hated and one I wanted to be all the time.

by Julia Lloyd· · Opinion, Voices
(Sophie Armstrong)

VOICES: Caring for someone with depression

Picture this: 11 weeks stuck in your bedroom after a complicated five-hour ankle surgery. Two metal rods and 20 screws later, you cannot walk. You just hop on your right foot to the bathroom, then back to bed. At the same time, the incessant banging of your major home renovation goes on all day long. Meals are brought to you in bed. You have to ask every time you want something, even just a glass of water.

How are you feeling? Trapped, secluded, isolated.  To sum it up in one word: depressed.

by Sophie Armstrong· · Health, Opinion, Voices
Movie Mondays: “Stronger”

Movie Mondays: “Stronger”

Every so often, there is a film that vocalizes the claustrophobia and hollowness of PTSD in just as an effective manner as any war movie ever could. Stronger, David Gordon Green’s biopic about the Boston Marathon bombings survivor Jeff Bauman, is the latest film to show just how overwhelming and depressive dealing with PTSD can be.

by Evan Manning· · Arts & Life, Film & Television, Opinion
We are constantly scrolling past beautiful images; like supermodels at #FashionWeek, subconsciously affecting our morale. (photo by Sophie Armstrong and Simona Catalano)

OPINION: Social media and the feeling of inadequacy

A beautiful flower arrangement sent from a seemingly perfect boyfriend, toned and fit bodies posing in front of a glamorous beach on the French Riviera, big smiles on a Southern Californian pier — these are just some of the vibrant images that we are constantly scrolling past on our Instagram feeds at any given moment.

We spend a lot of time scrolling. According to a Mediakix study conducted last year, it’s estimated that the average person will spend a total of five years and four months on social media within their lifetime.

by Nadia Khamsi· · Opinion, Voices
Naloxone kits are available at pharmacies across Toronto to anyone with a valid Ontario health
card. (Kayla Douglas/Linsey Raschkowan/Ryersonian)

EDITORIAL: Ryerson must equip itself with naloxone

Over the last year, Canadians have watched more and more people die from opioid overdoses across the country. The government of Ontario might not be calling it an emergency yet, but based on the numbers, it’s hard to see how it isn’t.

by Ryersonian Staff· · Editorial, Opinion
(Photo taken by Christiane Beya)

Is the extra sugar really worth it?

It started off with a simple, “Hey, how are you?” and escalated quickly to, “Are you free tomorrow evening? Want to catch up for coffee?”

This probably reads as a simple conversation between two friends, but it was actually a conversation between myself and my potential sugar daddy.

by Anonymous· · Opinion, Voices
Kayla McLaughlin, Reporter and Sports Editor for The Ryersonian

OPINION: Yes I’m in a long-distance relationship. Get over it.

Regardless of how a long-distance relationship comes about and why the two people are forced apart from each other, people will always have something to say. It can be stressful enough to leave everything you know and love — a house, a career, a family — to be with one person, even without the unsolicited opinions of others. The scenario […]

by Kayla McLaughlin· · Editorial, Opinion, Relationships
"It's difficult not to feel like sex is the epitome of romantic expression." (Iris Robin photographed by Yehuda Fisher)

OPINION: Love’s big fuck-up

How do you say “I love you” without using words? Perhaps you’d seek the perfect gift for your partner or get cosy for a casual night in. Maybe you’d go out to eat and savour the way your lover’s laugh sounds like the gentle swill of red wine. Would you spend an evening under the stars, shaping your shared desires […]

by Iris Robin· · Editorial, Opinion, Relationships
Confidence Is In, photo taken by Christiane Beya in CF Toronto Eaton Centre

OPINION: Loving yourself first

When you love who you are you accept yourself without anyone’s validation. Being comfortable in your own skin, knowing your worth, being aware of your limits and loving yourself are vital to a healthier and longer lasting relationship with your significant other. I firmly believe that you do not need anyone else to meet your expectations but yourself. Self-growth will […]

by Christiane Beya· · Opinion, Voices
VOICES: An open letter to Hollywood

VOICES: An open letter to Hollywood

Hi Hollywood, I wanted to introduce myself, in case you weren’t sure what a genuine Asian person looks like. Surprise! I’m a far cry from Scarlett Johansson.  But you knew that, didn’t you? You must have, since the Internet explodes every time you even consider casting a white actor as a character of colour. How else do you explain the […]

by Christine Chua· · Film & Television, Opinion
(Photo by Sally Goldberg Powell)

Movie Mondays: “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”

Films directed by Martin McDonagh exist in a world of extravagant violence and interminable cursing. Hearing the words shit or fuck are as likely as hearing hello and punches are not shied away from in the slightest. No one outside of Quentin Tarantino intertwines the two with such seamless results. And although McDonagh relentlessly employs these devices, it is never […]

by Evan Manning· · Arts & Life, Film & Television, Opinion
Canada West TV, the home for university sports out west, will charge viewers about $5 per game. (Photo courtesy of Pixabay)

OPINION: Students won’t pay for Canada West TV’s streaming service

On the bus? Stream the Jays game. In a boring class? Stream the Leafs game. On the toilet? Texans vs. Bengals should keep you occupied for the entirety of your stay. Earlier this summer, Canada West TV, the home for university sports out west, unveiled a fresh new look to go with their brand new, pay-per-view online video streaming system […]

by Daniel Marino· · Opinion, Sports
The view from....

VOICES: Returning to Venezuela

‘The quality of life for millions… can be destroyed by the ambitions of a powerful elite’ By: Ricardo Serrano I couldn’t believe I was finally doing it. This summer I was returning to Venezuela, my home country, three years after moving to Canada. When I left Venezuela, I never thought I would spend so much time away from home. Now […]

by Ryersonian Staff· · Opinion, Voices
EDITORIAL: OneCards? Rye can do better

EDITORIAL: OneCards? Rye can do better

The first week of class should be a time for students to familiarize themselves with campus facilities, workrooms, and program-specific resources. But for some Ryerson students, that couldn’t be done. New and returning students alike found campus facilities restricted. The reason? OneCards — the Ryerson designated student ID and access cards. Unfortunately, for some students, OneCards weren’t fulfilling their “access […]

by Ryersonian Staff· · Editorial, Opinion
OPINION: How to be a perfect significant other

OPINION: How to be a perfect significant other

I am the perfect boyfriend. I can say this with something almost close to confidence, I think… You’d have to ask my girlfriend for assurance though. If you’re wondering how to be like me, a perfect significant other, I have an easy set of steps for you to abide by. Make yourself comfortable. I am here to take you down […]

by Evan Manning· · Opinion
(Courtesy Warner Bros. Pictures)

Monday movie reviews: “It”

Up until the age of maybe six or seven, I was afraid of the basement. I would stand at the top of the staircase in my old house, frozen in a state of fright as I gazed down into the shadowy abyss for minutes at a time. When the lights were off, I always thought there was something looming in […]

by Evan Manning· · Arts & Life, Film & Television, Media, Opinion
Monique Jagpal/Ryersonian Staff

Editorial Cartoon: Ready to be a real adult?

From everyone here at the Ryersonian, congratulations to all the graduates!

by Monique Jagpal· · Editorial Cartoon, Opinion
Brooklyn Neustaeter writes about an app that tracks her daily activity, sleep cycles and stress levels.

86 per cent stressed? There’s an app for that

“I actually got stressed about how stressed I was.”

by Brooklyn Neustaeter· · Opinion, Voices
Kendall Jenner and her flat can of Pepsi

Kendall Jenner and her flat can of Pepsi

“I always knew there was a reason I liked Coca Cola more.”

by Lamees Wajahat· · Guest Opinion, Opinion
The SLC at Ryerson is one of the university's newest additions to the campus' public realm (Isabelle Docto)(Isabelle Docto)

One high-heeled step closer to equality in the workplace

British Columbia’s ban on the requirement of high heels in the workplace is a step in the right direction.

by Palak Mangat· · Editorial, Opinion
Chris Blanchette, Ryersonian Staff

Editorial Cartoon: Exam Season

From everyone here at the Ryersonian, good luck on your exams!

A screengrab from the short film, As Niagara Falls. (Courtesy Mayday Pictures)

Film’s mission was accomplished

Last week, the Ryersonian reported on a group of Ryerson students whose short film on the city of Niagara Falls was making the rounds on social media.

by Palak Mangat· · Editorial, Opinion
Justin Bellmore recalls a time when he was about six as one of the first times his father realized he was colour-blind.

Roses are green, violets are purple?

The way I see the world through a colour-blind lens, and how I deal with it.

by Justin Bellmore· · Opinion, students, Voices
Alexandria Pankratz urges incoming Ryerson students to enjoy their time in university.

Life’s too short, rack up that debt

“Standing at the finish line of my degree, I look back and see everything in a completely different light.”

by Alexandria Pankratz· · Guest Opinion, Opinion
Monique Jagpal/Ryersonian Staff

Editorial Cartoon: Milk sales in Canada vs. the U.S.

Milk sales in Canada vs. the U.S.

by Monique Jagpal· · Editorial Cartoon, Opinion
Brianne Spiker in Ryerson's Recreation and Athletics Centre. (Luke Galati/Ryersonian Staff)

Ice-cream sandwiches and gains

‘Three years ago, the RAC took a chance on a shy kid for the front desk.’

by Brianne Spiker· · jobs, Opinion, Sports, students, Voices
Ryerson University is  interested in tracking diversity on campus through a race-based survey despite some privacy concerns.(Ryersonian file photo)

University needs race-based data

” … fact-based reporting will trump anecdotal evidence, always.”

Julia Ho in Ryerson's Rogers Communications Centre. (Chris Blanchette/Ryersonian Staff)

The danger of political binaries

We’ve become so scared of exploring political faculties that don’t align with the overarching political group in which we strive to belong. The sheer inability to step outside of our socio-political bubbles has effectively segregated the population into either “us” or the “other.”

by Julia Ho· · Guest Opinion, Opinion, Politics
How to ace your exams

How to ace your exams

Taylor Moyle uses the leitner method to see if he can learn about something he knows nothing about. Watch and find out what happens.

Karen Chan. (Chris Blanchette/Ryersonian Staff)

Careers, children and choices

Would I drop everything to stay at home and only take care of my family? No matter how I think about it, my answer is always no.

by Karen Chan· · career, Guest Opinion, Opinion
Monique Jagpal/Ryersonian Staff

Editorial Cartoon: Honest campus tours

(Courtesy: iStock)

Trip cancellation is disheartening, but not surprising

Our No. 1 priority has always been the physical safety of students.

by Palak Mangat· · Editorial, Opinion
Diana Whistance-Smith on her internship in Florence, Italy. (Courtesy Diana Whistance-Smith, Amerigo)

How being a self-taught polyglot changed my journalism career

I was “the Canadian assistant visiting from Italy who spoke minimal German but did a great job.”

by Diana Whistance-Smith· · career, Opinion, Travel, Voices
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