Opinion: Are millennials too lazy to eat cereal for breakfast?

A new study says 40 per cent of millennials said that cereal was an inconvenient breakfast choice because they had to clean up afterwards. (Couresty: musicfanatic29/Creative Commons)

A new study says 40 per cent of millennials said that cereal was an inconvenient breakfast choice because they had to clean up afterwards.
(Courtesy musicfanatic29/Creative Commons)

 

By Dylan Bell and Jasmin Husain

It was quite the week for millennials when it came to entertainment news.

  • Leo might finally win an Oscar this weekend
  • Netflix’s bingeworthy Full House sequel, Fuller House, just came out
  • Kanye West, in typical Kanye West performative fashion, has spent the week continually outKanye Westing himself
  • Cult sensations Broad City and Girls returned with new seasons Feb. 28
  • And in other news, Drake continued to be alive this week

These stories are timely and they drive traffic, but most importantly they resonate with a particular niche audience — millennials. Millennials love Leo. Millennials love Netflix too, but they really love Full House. Double win.Traffic multiplier. Cash register sound.

But if there’s anything that media outlets love more than stories for millennials, it’s stories that highlight millennial ineptitudes. For example, take Time magazine’s infamous 2013 cover story on “The Me Me Me Generation,” where author Joel Stein proclaimed that not only are millennials narcissistic, but also entitled and lazy. Making fun of millennials has become something of an art form for mainstream media.

So when the word millennial made it into a headline on the front page of the Toronto Star this week, we braced for impact. The Star referenced a Mintel study that said that almost 40 per cent of the millennials surveyed for its annual research report said that cereal was an inconvenient breakfast choice because they had to “clean up after eating it.”

That one, single line in a six-month-old, 107-page report quickly became the face that launched a thousand ships. The Washington Post’s URL for the online article is simply “/this-is-the-height-of-laziness.” New York Magazine skipped the pleasantries altogether, point-blank titling its coverage “Millennials are literally too lazy to eat cereal.” The CBC called us “bowl-haters” and Global explained that we’re avoiding the breakfast choice because we view it as an “overwhelming hassle” that is “far too difficult.”

But is all of this really true? Are we really that lazy? And more importantly, are we really bowl-haters?

We decided to interview some Ryerson students to find out if these findings held up to the test.

Watch the video below to find out.

One Comment

  1. Vincent Basinski says:

    We really need another Millennial hot take. F***ing brutal.

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