Story by Bianca Zanotti and Jessica Canjemanaden

The 43rd Toronto International Film Festival (TIFF) is well underway and these are films we might just line up three hours at the box office to see:

Mid 90s Jonah Hill gets behind the camera for his directorial debut in a coming of age film set in Los Angeles and follows 13-year-old Stevie. Mid 90s is the latest offering from the hot new production company on the block, A24, which put out summer favourites like Hereditary and Eighth Grade. The film stars Sunny Suljic, Lucas Hedges and Katherine Waterston. Sounds like a KIDS by Larry Clark reboot, but we’re here for it.

If Beale Street Could Talk After winning Best Picture at the 2017 Oscars for Moonlight, Barry Jenkins returns with an adaptation of James Baldwin’s poetic novel about a pregnant woman’s fight to free her falsely accused husband from prison before her child is born. Consider this a poem on a screen, with lyricism, love and lingering shots of 1970s New York that are certain to soothe souls.

Beautiful Boy — Any Call Me By Your Name fans out there? Timothée Chalamet is back on the screen in Beautiful Boy, a film that follows Nic’s (Chalamet) addiction to methamphetamine and the journey his family is forced to go through as a result. The film is based off the bestselling books by father-son duo David and Nic Sheff, and is director Felix van Groeningen’s first English-language film. Beautiful, indeed.

Timothée Chalamet speaks to reporters at the screening of “Beautiful Boy” at the Toronto International Film Festival on Sept. 7, 2018. (Alexia Del Priore)

Halloween With October around the corner, David Gordon Green’s sequel to John Carpenter’s 1978 original Halloween comes at a perfect time. The screening is a one-night-only event at TIFF, sparking intense buzz. It sold out in seconds, but that’s not surprising. Influential horror producer Jason Blum of Blumhouse Productions personally called up the director of Pineapple Express to create this new take on a classic. Get ready to be spooked.

Clara Ryerson graduate Akash Sherman’s latest feature delves into the relationship between an obsessive astronomer and his free-spirited and open-minded research partner. The pair, played by real-life couple Patrick J. Adams and Troian Bellisario, connects while searching for proof of life on other planets. Sherman’s film subtly tackles humankind’s curiosity with things outside our world, and emotions deep within our souls.

Firecrackers Another Ram worth waiting in TIFF lines for. Ryerson alumna Jasmin Mozaffari brings a tale of friendship and freedom to TIFF’s screens this festival season with her feature debut Firecrackers. The film, led by an almost all-female key crew, tells the story of Lou and Chantal, two best friends who dream of leaving their patriarchal suburban town for New York. The film challenges the stereotype of delicate young girls by casting strong female characters.

Widows Four female leads? We’re definitely into it. And four women who take fate into their own hands after their husbands all criminally connected are killed?  That’s worth lining up for in some Toronto rain. Steve McQueen, director of Academy Award-winning 12 Years a Slave, co-writes this thriller with Gone Girl’s Gillian Flynn. A star-studded cast including Viola Davis, Daniel Kaluuya, Liam Neeson and Colin Farrell fills the screen and brings this gem to life.  

Giant Little Ones Teenage Franky (Josh Wiggins) is trying to come to grips with the fact that his father left his mom for a man when he has an unexpected sexual encounter with his best friend. Timely, troubling and, in the end triumphant, Giant Little Ones is director Keith Behrman’s second feature film. Critics are suggesting this may be a TIFF fan fave.

The Hate U Give Based on Angie Thomas’s bestselling book, The Hate U Give (George Tillman, Jr.) is a timely film about race and police brutality in the United States. Starr Carter (Amandla Stenberg) lives two different lives — her life in Garden Heights, filled with crime and gangs, and her life at school, a mainly-white private school.  Everything collides when Starr witnesses her best friend Khalil get shot by police at a car stop and then becomes a community activist trying to get justice.

A Star is Born Little Monsters rejoice. Lady Gaga rocks TIFF screens with A Star is Born, directed by actor Bradley Cooper. Fame-weary Jackson Maine (Cooper), a rock artist who isolated himself after years in the spotlight, walks into a bar and hears the striking voice of Ally (Gaga). The two connect instantly, Maine introduces Ally to the world of fame and … a star is born.

So, get your comfy – yet fashionable – shoes on and get in line. TIFF runs until Sept. 16. You can find a list of showtimes and films at https://www.tiff.net/tiff/films.html?list.

If Beale Street Could Talk After winning Best Picture at the 2017 Oscars for Moonlight, Barry Jenkins returns with an adaptation of James Baldwin’s poetic novel about a pregnant woman’s fight to free her falsely accused husband from prison before her child is born. Consider this a poem on a screen, with lyricism, love and lingering shots of 1970s New York that are certain to soothe souls.

Giant Little Ones — Teenage Franky (Josh Wiggins) is trying to come to grips with the fact that his father left his mom for a man when he has an unexpected sexual encounter with his best friend. Timely, troubling and, in the end triumphant, Giant Little Ones is director Keith Behrman’s second feature film. Critics are suggesting this may be a TIFF fan fave.

Halloween With October around the corner, David Gordon Green’s sequel to John Carpenter’s 1978 original Halloween comes at a perfect time. The screening is a one-night-only event at TIFF, sparking intense buzz. It sold out in seconds, but that’s not surprising. Influential horror producer Jason Blum of Blumhouse Productions personally called up the director of Pineapple Express to create this new take on a classic. Get ready to be spooked.


Clara Ryerson graduate Akash Sherman’s latest feature delves into the relationship between an obsessive astronomer and his free-spirited and open-minded research partner. The pair, played by real-life couple Patrick J. Adams and Troian Bellisario, connects while searching for proof of life on other planets. Sherman’s film subtly tackles humankind’s curiosity with things outside our world, and emotions deep within our souls.

Firecrackers Another Ram worth waiting in TIFF lines for. Ryerson alumna Jasmin Mozaffari brings a tale of friendship and freedom to TIFF’s screens this festival season with her feature debut Firecrackers. The film, led by an almost all-female key crew, tells the story of Lou and Chantal, two best friends who dream of leaving their patriarchal suburban town for New York. The film challenges the stereotype of delicate young girls by casting strong female characters.

Widows Four female leads? We’re definitely into it. And four women who take fate into their own hands after their husbands all criminally connected are killed?  That’s worth lining up for in some Toronto rain. Steve McQueen, director of Academy Award-winning 12 Years a Slave, co-writes this thriller with Gone Girl’s Gillian Flynn. A star-studded cast including Viola Davis, Daniel Kaluuya, Liam Neeson and Colin Farrell fills the screen and brings this gem to life.  


The Hate U Give Based on Angie Thomas’s bestselling book, The Hate U Give (George Tillman, Jr.) is a timely film about race and police brutality in the United States. Starr Carter (Amandla Stenberg) lives two different lives — her life in Garden Heights, filled with crime and gangs, and her life at school, a mainly-white private school.  Everything collides when Starr witnesses her best friend Khalil get shot by police at a car stop and then becomes a community activist trying to get justice.

A Star is Born Little Monsters rejoice. Lady Gaga rocks TIFF screens with A Star is Born, directed by actor Bradley Cooper. Fame-weary Jackson Maine (Cooper), a rock artist who isolated himself after years in the spotlight, walks into a bar and hears the striking voice of Ally (Gaga). The two connect instantly, Maine introduces Ally to the world of fame and … a star is born.

Beautiful Boy Any Call Me By Your Name fans out there? Timothée Chalamet is back on the screen in Beautiful Boy, a film that follows Nic’s (Chalamet) addiction to methamphetamine and the journey his family is forced to go through as a result. The film is based off the bestselling books by father-son duo David and Nic Sheff, and is director Felix van Groeningen’s first English-language film. Beautiful, indeed.

So, get your comfy – yet fashionable – shoes on and get in line. TIFF runs until Sept. 16. You can find a list of showtimes and films at https://www.tiff.net/tiff/films.html?list.

This is a joint byline. Ryersonian staff are responsible for the news website edited and produced by final-year undergraduate and graduate journalism students at Ryerson University. It features all the content from the weekly campus newspaper, The Ryersonian, and distributes news and online multimedia, including video newscasts from RyersonianTV. Ryersonian.ca also provides videos, images, and other interactive material in partnership with the School of Journalism.

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